2005-11-30

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-30 10:00

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift east-southeastward in the morning and eastward later in the day.

Recent observations: There have been no significant changes in the pattern of activity during the past 24 hours. Stormy weather will likely preclude field operations for the remainder of this week.



2005-11-29

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-29 10:00

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift eastward.

Recent observations: There have been no significant changes in the pattern of activity during the past 24 hours. Recent measurements indicate that volcanic gas emission rates remain low. Stormy weather will likely preclude field operations for the remainder of this week.



2005-11-28

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-28 10:00

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift northwestward at low altitude and east-southeastward at higher altitudes early in the day, and northward to northeastward later in the day.

Recent observations: There have been no significant changes in the pattern of activity during the past 24 hours. Stormy weather forecast for the coming week will likely preclude field operations.



2005-11-27

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-27 10:00

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift eastward.

Recent observations: Icicles partially blocked a clear early morning view from the VolcanoCam. Weather related outages of a satellite communications link continue to plague reception of data streams from some of the crater seismic and deformation instruments. Most monitoring data are being received continuously, and they show no significant change in deformation trends and ongoing small “drumbeat” earthquakes, the signal of dome extrusion, every one to two minutes.



2005-11-26

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-26 10:15

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift eastward to southeastward early in the day and eastward later in the day.

Recent observations: Stormy weather in the mountains is obscuring any views of the volcano this morning. A satellite telemetry link that brings in some of the seismic and geodetic data from the volcano appears to have gone down again late yesterday morning. Other stations, on which event alarms are keyed, are being received continuously. The data streams coming in indicate that the level of eruptive activity remains unchanged.



2005-11-25

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-25 09:30

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift northeastward early in the day and eastward to northeastward later in the day.

Recent observations: The volcano is obscured by clouds this morning as a winter storm moves through the area. At times, strong winds accompanying the storm may increase the background noise level on some of the seismometers around the volcano. Data from field instruments indicate that the level of eruptive activity remains unchanged from that of recent weeks.



2005-11-24

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-24 10:00

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift northward to northeastward.

Recent observations: The crater of the volcano is currently clear, but clouds are moving into the area. Seismic and geodetic data from field instruments indicate that eruptive activity remains unchanged from recent trends.



2005-11-23

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-23 10:00


Fixed location views taken on 2005-Nov-21/22

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift northward at low altitudes and northwestward to northeastward at high altitudes early in the day and northward to southeastward at all altitudes later in the day.

Recent observations: Two notable rockfalls occurred yesterday, one just before noon and another shortly after 3:00 PM. Both produced a dilute ash cloud that rose to a couple of thousand feet above the crater rim. These types of events are common during dome growth. Seismicity remains unchanged with earthquakes occurring on average about every one to two minutes. Yesterday, field crews made airborne gas measurements and finished installing the new tiltmeter.



2005-11-22

 

News Report Update



 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-22 10:55

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift northwestward early in the day and northward to northeastward later in the day.

Recent observations: Clear conditions show the growing lava dome emitting a modest steam plume this morning. Seismicity remains unchanged with earthquakes occurring on average about every one to two minutes. Crews are in the field today to finish winterizing the newly installed tiltmeter and to make airborne gas measurements.



2005-11-21

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-21 08:35

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift westward at low altitudes and southward at higher altitudes early in the day and westward at all altitudes later. Forecast wind speeds remain low, so any ash clouds would drift slowly.

Recent observations: The growing lava dome is clear this morning with only minor fuming from several persistent areas of gas release. Seismicity remains remarkably constant. If wind conditions tomorrow permit, scientists will make aerial measurements of gas emissions. No other field work is planned for this week.



2005-11-20

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-20 10:25

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift eastward early in the day and east-southeastward later. Low-altitude winds are light and variable so any low-altitude ash clouds would drift slowly.

Recent observations: A weak vapor plume is rising from the actively growing western part of the new lava dome this morning. Seismic and ground-deformation data remain within well-established patterns.



2005-11-19

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-19 08:50

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift northwestward to northward at all elevations early, remain in that trajectory at low elevations all day, but shift to a northeastward trajectory at high elevations later in the day.

Recent observations: Over the past few days, crews successfully installed a tiltmeter in the crater and new cameras at the crater mouth and on the east crater rim, repaired and replaced seismometers and installed a new GPS on the new lava dome, repaired communications linkages, and collected new thermal imagery. Views from various vantage points show clearly that the active part of the new lava dome has risen several tens of meters since latter October, demonstrating without doubt that dome growth continues. This growth continues to be accompanied by a remarkably regular and repetitive series of small earthquakes. Clear conditions at the volcano this morning reveal a vapor plume emitting from the area of active growth.



2005-11-18

 

USGS Photo Update


Views taken on 2005-Nov-17
A variety of views taken during clear weather on 2005-Nov-17.



 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-18 09:30

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift slowly and in widely differing directions owing to light and variable winds. Dominant directions are westward and eastward at low altitudes and, at higher altitudes, southeastward early in the day to southwestward later.

Recent observations: Crews had a successful day in the field yesterday and are out again today. Final work on the new tiltmeter and camera sites, as well as a thermal-imaging flight, is underway. A camera set up on the old lava dome will take an hours-long sequence of close-up photographs of the active extrusion to gage the rate of activity. Monitoring data show no significant changes in well-established patterns of seismicity and ground deformation.



2005-11-17

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-17 09:30

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift westward to northward at low altitudes and eastward to southeastward at higher altitudes. Wind speeds are forecast to be low so any ash clouds would move away from the volcano sluggishly.

Recent observations: Field crews got an early start this morning. One crew is currently installing another tiltmeter on the old lava dome. Others are getting ready to deploy an additional camera near the northwest crater mouth, recover and deploy seismic and GPS spiders on the new lava dome, and repair some telemetry equipment. Views from the camera installed on the south crater rim show continued growth of the active part of the new lava dome over the past three weeks.



2005-11-16

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-16 08:15

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift southeastward.

Recent observations: All data communications links are functioning again, and the data streaming in show no significant change in eruptive activity. At 10:55 pm (local time) Tuesday another moderate-sized earthquake (M2.7) occurred amidst the ongoing background of small drumbeat earthquakes. Clear weather at the mountain this morning reveals a moderate vapor plume enveloping a snow-clad lava dome. Tomorrow, if the weather holds, field crews plan to retrieve, repair, and install new instrumentation, and on Friday to collect new aerial photography and thermal imagery.



2005-11-15

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-15 08:55

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift southeastward.

Recent observations: Outages to a satellite communications link continue to plague receipt of data streams from some of the crater seismic and deformation instrumentation. However, data streams from key seismic and deformation stations continue to be received, and those instruments show no significant changes in seismic or deformation trends of recent weeks. With good weather expected to hold, field crews have plans this week to install a new tiltmeter, deploy a new GPS instrument and new cameras, retrieve and repair a seismometer, and collect new aerial photography and thermal imagery.



2005-11-14

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-14 10:15

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift southeastward.

Recent observations: A moderately sized earthquake (M2.6) occurred last night amidst the ongoing series of small, drumbeat earthquakes. Otherwise seismicity and deformation continue trends of recent weeks. Field crews hope to take advantage of good weather this week to retrieve, repair, and install field instrumentation.



2005-11-13

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-13 10:50

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift eastward to east-southeastward.

Recent observations: The disrupted satellite-telemetry link that brings in some of the data from monitoring stations is operating once again. The problem appears to be that build-up of wet sticky snow on the dish antenna causes loss of signals. Seismic and deformation data continue trends of recent weeks and suggest no significant change in eruptive activity. An encouraging weather forecast for the coming week may allow for some field operations.



2005-11-12

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-12 08:50

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift eastward to east-southeastward early in the day and eastward to east-northeastward later in the day.

Recent observations: Signals from a few crater seismometers have experienced intermittent outage again due to weather-related interruptions to one particular communications link. However, other stations on which alarms are keyed are transmitted through multiple pathways, and their signals are received continuously. As winter grips the mountain, intermittent signal outage from some instruments may recur. The robust data stream coming in indicates no significant change in eruptive activity.



2005-11-11

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-11 08:50


Aerial views taken on 2005-Nov-09

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift east-northeastward.

Recent observations: Broken clouds flirt with the volcano this morning and provide intermittent views of the crater. The data streams coming in show that the remarkably regular, small “drumbeat” earthquakes continue to occur about every one to two minutes. Results of Wednesday’s gas flight show that gas emissions remain low and are similar to those measured on the previous several flights.



2005-11-10

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-10 08:25

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift strongly northeastward.

Recent observations: Both USGS and USFS field crews had busy days yesterday repairing communications links and camera circuitry, retrieving and repairing seismometers, and measuring volcanic gases. Images are again streaming from the USFS VolcanoCam, and communications with crater seismometers and remote USGS cameras at the mountain have been reestablished. Images from those remote cameras show that the active part of the lava dome continues to grow and has risen visibly since the end of October. Seismicity and other monitoring data remain unchanged from recent trends.



2005-11-09

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-09 09:00

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift lazily northwestward to northeastward at low elevation and strongly southeastward at high elevations early in the day, then shift to east-northeastward trajectories at all elevations later in the day.

Recent observations: A lack of signals from cameras inhibits remote viewing of the volcano today. Clear views from town indicate that the volcano is emitting a vapor plume, likely similar to the one observed during a brief aerial reconnaissance of the crater late Monday afternoon. Field crews will attempt to exploit the good weather today to measure volcanic gases and retrieve and repair a couple of seismometers in the crater. Seismicity and other monitoring data remain unchanged from recent trends.



2005-11-08

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-08 09:15

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift southeastward.

Recent observations: A brief aerial reconnaissance of the crater late yesterday afternoon showed little observable change from our last views on October 30. A vapor plume rose from the actively growing part of the lava dome and concealed the area where dome growth is probably concentrated. The plume drifted over the crater rim and created a pretty view from the metropolitan area. Seismicity and other monitoring data remain unchanged from recent trends.



2005-11-07

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-07 09:10

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift northeastward early in the day and eastward later.

Recent observations: We haven’t had views of the volcano for several days owing to ongoing storminess. Remote cameras are probably covered with rime ice and drifted snow. Seismic and geodetic data from field instruments indicate that eruptive activity remains unchanged from recent trends.



2005-11-06

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-06 10:45

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift eastward to east-northeastward.

Recent observations: Scientists have traced the cause of the recent loss of signals from several crater seismic stations to a combination of ice and strong winds that slightly rotated a satellite-telemetry antenna. Once the wind drops, we should be able to realign the antenna and get the signals back. The current weather-related problems demonstrate the need for our redundant telemetry paths (ground-based radio and satellite) and dual bases (Vancouver and Seattle), which provide robustness to the monitoring system. Eruptive activity remains unchanged from recent patterns.



2005-11-05

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-05 08:40

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift eastward early and shift to a more eastward to east-northeastward trajectory later in the day.

Recent observations: Intermittent loss of signals from crater seismic and GPS stations indicate that stations remain functional but that probable snow and ice buildup on antennae are interrupting radio transmissions. With winter settling in at the mountain, such intermittent disruptions may become commonplace. This morning, clouds continue to obscure the volcano. The data stream coming in, however, indicates no significant change in eruptive activity.



2005-11-04

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-04 09:15


Aerial views taken on 2005-Oct-30

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift east-northeastward to eastward.

Recent observations: We have experienced the first impairment or loss of field instruments during this first major snowfall of the winter season. Deep snow and icing typically take a toll on solar panels, transmitting antennas, and other components. Seismic station NED on the old lava dome stopped transmitting this morning. It appears that the GPS spider that is riding on the west glacier may now be buried and its radio signals blocked. Most seismic and GPS stations on the old and new lava domes lie in areas of warm ground that will hopefully not accumulate deep snow. We maintain a cache of spare parts and, if sites are damaged, we are prepared to make needed repairs as soon as weather conditions allow



2005-11-03

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-03 08:40

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift northeastward early and strongly eastward later in the day.

Recent observations: Thick storm clouds obscure the volcano this morning, and the forecast is for continued storminess over the next several days. There has been no significant change in the degree or character of seismicity over the past few days. Small, repetitive “drumbeat” earthquakes continue to occur once every one to two minutes, with an occasional larger earthquake superposed.



2005-11-02

 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-02 09:25

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift east-northeastward.

Recent observations: Clouds obscure the volcano again this morning. The view from the VolcanoCam shows the snow level well below the crater. As long as cold temperatures persist, the threat of small rainfall-induced debris flows from the crater is diminished. Remarkably regular small earthquakes continue to occur at a rate of about one every one to two minutes. When the weather improves, field crews will try to obtain observations.



2005-11-01

 

USGS Spirit Lake Camera Images


Spirit Lake Camera

The USGS has made available a series of images of Mt.St.Helens taken over the summer from a fixed location.

The Spirit Lake "VolcanoCam" was developed by Winston Stokes and placed in the field on June 29, 2005. ... The camera is approximately five and one half miles from Mount St. Helens volcano and just catches a glimpse of the Mount St. Helens crater and dome. ... The following collection is a sampling from over 1,000 images taken between June 29 and September 23, 2005. Not all the images were selected for their view of the dome. Some are simply interesting and/or dramatic.



 

USGS Update 2005-Nov-01 09:20

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that any ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift northeastward to eastward.

Recent observations: Clouds continue to obscure the volcano although views from the VolcanoCam late yesterday afternoon showed a small vapor plume rising off parts of the growing lava dome. Small repetitive “drumbeat” earthquakes, the signal of dome extrusion, continue at a remarkably regular rate of about one every minute and a half. The weather forecast for the week suggests that we won’t be able to get into the field and that views of the dome will be limited.



Standard USGS Update

Growth of the new lava dome inside the crater of Mount St. Helens continues, accompanied by low rates of seismicity, low emissions of steam and volcanic gases, and minor production of ash. During such eruptions, episodic changes in the level of activity can occur over days to months. The eruption could also intensify suddenly or with little warning and produce explosions that cause hazardous conditions within several miles of the crater and farther downwind. Small lahars could suddenly descend the Toutle River if triggered by heavy rain or by interaction of hot rocks with snow and ice. These lahars pose a negligible hazard below the Sediment Retention Structure (SRS) but could pose a hazard along the river channel upstream.

Potential ash hazards to aviation: Under current eruptive conditions, small, short-lived explosions may produce ash clouds that exceed 30,000 feet in altitude. Ash from such events can travel 100 miles or more downwind.

The U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Washington continue to monitor the situation closely and will issue additional updates and changes in alert level as warranted.

My intent with this page is to provide a clearning house for links to the current activity at Mt.St.Helens. Please send me any links of interest that you may come across, whether for permanent sites or for news reports. I'm not going to be able to do this all alone and all help will be appreciated.

(Disclaimer— I have no association with anyone or any organization, and speak only for myself. Links and quotes are provided for information only.)

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