2006-01-11

 

Last Posting

Notice:

This will be the last posting for this site. It's moving to a new location:
http://sputs.com/fitzherbert/index.php. All the old posts have been moved there. Update your links and bookmarks as appropriate. For now, everything here will be left as is.



 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-11 09:15

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the east-northeast.

Recent observations: No significant changes in the level or type of activity at the mountain have been noted since yesterday’s update. The most significant event over the last 24 hours was a magnitude 2.7 earthquake at 1016 PST yesterday morning that, unlike several other larger events over the last 10 days, had no obvious effect on the “drumbeat” earthquakes. Views this morning from the U.S. Forest Service’s web camera at the Johnston Ridge Observatory are completely obscured by clouds and occasional flakes of snow from the storm system du jour.



2006-01-10

 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-10 08:30

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the east-northeast.

Recent observations: No significant changes in the level or type of activity at the mountain have been noted since yesterday’s update. The series of winter storms sweeping through the area over the last several days have dumped several feet of snow onto instruments located on the flanks and crater floor of Mount St. Helens. Most continue to function admirably, although occasional radio signal dropouts from several instruments occurred overnight. Given the dense network of stations on the volcano, the dropouts are not having an appreciable affect on our monitoring capabilities. With the forecast calling for several more feet’s-worth of snow through the end of the week, it is likely that occasional dropouts will continue to occur.



2006-01-09

 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-09 08:45

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the northeast.

Recent observations: Another hour-long lull in the “drumbeat” earthquakes occurred following a larger earthquake at 1723 PST yesterday afternoon. Drumbeats have since returned to normal levels, and no other significant changes in the level or type of activity at the mountain have been noted since yesterday’s update. It has been three full weeks since our last view of the volcano, and the rain- and snow-filled forecast gives little reason for optimism that visual observations or field work will be possible in the coming week.



2006-01-08

 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-08 10:30

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the east and southeast.

Recent observations:No significant changes in the level or type of activity at the mountain have been noted since yesterday’s update. The pattern of “drumbeat” earthquakes every two to three minutes was undisturbed by any larger quakes overnight. No visual observations or field work were possible owing to continued inclement weather.



2006-01-07

 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-07 10:00

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the northeast.

Recent observations: No significant changes in the level or type of activity at the mountain have been noted since yesterday’s update. A larger (M. 2.7) event shook the mountain yesterday evening (18:14 PST, 02:14 Jan 7 UTC) but failed to trigger any extensive decrease in the frequency of the “drum beat” events as was noticed after earthquakes of similar size earlier in the month. The mountain appears to be proving true the adage “patterns are made to be broken”. No visual observations or field work were possible owing to continued inclement weather.



2006-01-06

 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-06 10:00

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the northeast.

Recent observations: No significant changes in the level or type of activity at the mountain have been noted since yesterday’s update. A somewhat larger than average event occurred yesterday afternoon (17:06 PST, 01:06 Jan 6 UTC) but failed to trigger the type of seismic lull described in yesterday’s update. The pattern of drumbeats with the possibility of interspersed larger events continues. Inclement weather continues at the volcano. The long term forecast calls for a series of storm cells to pass over the region in the next few days leaving us little hope of any extensive views into the crater or field work.



2006-01-05

 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-05 09:30

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the northeast.

Recent observations: Low level activity continues at the mountain unabated today. A protracted lull in the usual “drumbeat” events was observed yesterday after a somewhat larger earthquake at 17:12 UTC (09:12 PST). The lull lasted about 110 minutes after which the regular pattern of small events occurring every two to three minutes reasserted itself. This phenomenon was similar to but much longer than that observed after a larger quake on the morning of January 1st. Since yesterday morning’s event the mountain has returned to the behavior that has become usual, namely, small events every few minutes with the possibility of larger events occurring intermittently. This pattern of seismicity and that of other monitored parameters suggest that the slow extrusion of the new lava dome is continuing. As has been true since mid-December, winter weather conditions continue to preclude visual observations or field work.



2006-01-04

 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-04 09:30

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the northeast.

Recent observations: The pattern of seismicity at the volcano remains essentially unchanged from the previous few weeks. A strong (M 6.7) earthquake occurred at 08:32 UTC (00:32 PST) in the Gulf of California and registered clearly on seismographs across the region including several from the Mt. St. Helens network. Such distant events may take a few to many minutes to reach the seismometers at Mount St. Helens and show up as large, very low frequency undulations in the seismic trace. A technical problem with our satellite telemetry system interrupted the transmission of data from several seismic stations for approximately ten hours last night. Other stations that transmit directly to the observatory continued to provide us with seismic data throughout the outage. As has been the case over the last few months small earthquakes continue to be recorded every 2-3 minutes. This pattern of seismicity coupled with other monitoring parameters suggests the slow extrusion of dacite onto the crater floor at Mount St. Helens continues unabated. Typical winter weather conditions continue to preclude visual observations or field work.



2006-01-03

 

News Report Update



 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-03 10:30

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the northeast.

Recent observations: The pattern of seismicity remains essentially unchanged from the previous few weeks. Small earthquakes continue to be recorded every 2-3 minutes with slightly larger events occurring intermittently. This pattern of seismicity coupled with other monitoring parameters suggests the slow extrusion of dacite onto the crater floor at Mount St. Helens continues unabated. Typical winter weather conditions continue to preclude visual observations or field work.



2006-01-02

 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-02 07:30

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the northeast.

Recent observations: Small earthquakes continued every 2-3 minutes as dacite lava extrudes slowly within the crater of Mount St. Helens. At approximately 10:35 am (PST) January 1, a slightly larger earthquake marked a period of about 30 minutes before the return of persistent small earthquakes occurring every few minutes. Winter storms and snow level down to about 4000 ft altitude have not allowed visual observations.



2006-01-01

 

USGS Update 2006-Jan-01 10:55

Potential ash hazards: Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim would drift to the northeast early in the day but to the north by afternoon.

Recent observations: There was no volcanic revelry last night, only the persistent small earthquakes every 2-3 minutes to mark the slow extrusion of dacite lava within the crater of Mount St. Helens. Winter storms and snow level down to about 4000 ft altitude have precluded visual observations.



Standard USGS Update

Growth of the new lava dome inside the crater of Mount St. Helens continues, accompanied by low rates of seismicity, low emissions of steam and volcanic gases, and minor production of ash. During such eruptions, episodic changes in the level of activity can occur over days to months. The eruption could also intensify suddenly or with little warning and produce explosions that cause hazardous conditions within several miles of the crater and farther downwind. Small lahars could suddenly descend the Toutle River if triggered by heavy rain or by interaction of hot rocks with snow and ice. These lahars pose a negligible hazard below the Sediment Retention Structure (SRS) but could pose a hazard along the river channel upstream.

Potential ash hazards to aviation: Under current eruptive conditions, small, short-lived explosions may produce ash clouds that exceed 30,000 feet in altitude. Ash from such events can travel 100 miles or more downwind.

The U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Washington continue to monitor the situation closely and will issue additional updates and changes in alert level as warranted.

My intent with this page is to provide a clearning house for links to the current activity at Mt.St.Helens. Please send me any links of interest that you may come across, whether for permanent sites or for news reports. I'm not going to be able to do this all alone and all help will be appreciated.

(Disclaimer— I have no association with anyone or any organization, and speak only for myself. Links and quotes are provided for information only.)

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